DiscoveriesJP Hill

The Greatest Things In The Galaxy 10/19/17

DiscoveriesJP Hill
The Greatest Things In The Galaxy 10/19/17

All of the salvaged space junk, intercepted transmissions, and frontier discoveries that the Cosmic Incantations editorial team are excited about this week! Hit us up cosmicincantations@gmail.com and on social media (especially Instagram

  John Penn Browning

John Penn Browning

In the past couple weeks I've given some well deserved support to the label Shall Not Fade, a recent discovery of sorts for myself that came full circle when realizing a friend of mine had an eye on the second installment of their white label series which features reworks of familiar tunes with high energy geared at dance floor mayhem just months prior. Having grabbed up the most recent white label offering #3 along with the new Fold EP 'Doin' Bits' it goes without saying just how smitten I truly am with both releases. Head over to their Bandcamp to feel out the superbly jazzy yet deep and swoony Fold EP (cherry on top with a Frits Wentink remix) and while you're there give that Anthony Fade a listen as well.

Staying on that jazzy note, it was a pleasant surprise to see Brame & Hamo pop up in my feed with their new release coming in the next couple weeks. 'Clarence (Smooth Mix)' premiered on SoundCloud just yesterday thanks to Stamp The Wax and is another promising release with such a classic sound. This follows works on their own label Splendor & Squalor as well as the notable Heist Recordings. That's about it for me until next week comes around. Be safe and love one another in the meantime, y'all. 

  Jon Paul Hill

Jon Paul Hill

I just can't get enough of icey-cold synth lines paired with some warm bottom-end. I guess, if one had a preponderance for absurd and overly sexual similes, it could be described as whipped cream on a palpitating chest.  Not I though, never! I'll just say that this little fella from Sam IRL and Dusty on Jazz & Milk does the business for me right now! On slightly similar tip, Forward from Stan Yaroslavsky, is a late night mind-fuck and it's moving in to your apartment and giving you stories that your grandkids will never believe.  Oh, and I did a mix this week, features a few 'deep thrusters' that we've highlighted here.

  Ben Alexander

Ben Alexander

Temperatures may finally be getting cool for most people in the northern hemisphere, but believe me, there's no shortage of hot trax to recommend. Starting it off, Crackazat, a cosmic HQ favorite and UK born musician, released his second album last Friday, Rainbow Fantasia, on Local Talk. This double LP beauty is pulling on my feels more and more with each listen, ranging from playful and bright on the title track and Sundial, to late night, introspective, and jazzy tracks like Midnight in Sector Seven and Life Is. Something that has always fascinated me about Crackazat, and certainly holds true with this new release, is his ability to make complicated melodies so catchy, knowing when to add a crazy solo in, but at the same time, always keeping the groove the main focus. Continually inspiring. Go pick that one up here. Another one of my personal favorite producers, Palms Trax, contributed a track to the most recent Secretsundaze compilation, Dance 2017, and it's straight up Cloud City levels of deep (the place mostly, but of course like the track too). The boys behind the label, Giles Smith & James Priestley, have a nice track on here as well, so check that out over yonder. Rounding out the list for this week is a very important article by Luis-Manuel Garcia, published by Resident Advisor, about the history of sexuality in dance music. Although it's a few years old, the author does a great job of providing a comprehensive overview of the contributions that the LGBTQ community has made to dance music, from underground discotheques, to warehouse raves and beyond. It's easy for such a thing as dance music, which has become intertwined with pop culture, to lose sight of its roots, and that's certainly not a bad thing in some ways, but in regards to the marginalized groups that made up the foundation for all of it, there can never be a big enough light on them. I tend to get really passionate about this subject, so I'll just save the rest of my thoughts for a piece somewhere down the line. Read that article over here, and stay positive friendos.